Make a Member 
Donation Pledge Online

Headline News

Archive for the ‘book’ tag

New authors can now publish their own books with help from consultants

leave a comment

Edited by John Stokes

Are you seeking to publish your own book?  Have you been frustrated by corporate trade publishers rejecting your manuscript over and over? 

Agora is a not-for-profit publishing consultancy which can work with you in helping to get your book published, and available in book stores.  E-mail editor-in-chief@lecanadian.com for more information.

Written by admin

May 19th, 2010 at 7:08 am

Learn how to make money publishing your own book

leave a comment

Make an Op-Ed submission or advertise: editor-in-chief@lecanadian.com.

Edited by John Stokes

Have your written a manuscript?

Have you had your manuscript rejected by corporate trade publishers?

Are you seeking to get it self-published?

Get your own two hour personalized telephone/online seminar seminar on book self-publishing.

We also offer an in-person two seminar in Ottawa.

The lecturer/instructor is a member of the University of Toronto community who has taught at the college/university-level, and has coordinating publishing companies.

Cost: $95.00

internet site: http://www.agorapublishing.com

Do you like this article?  Donate. Become a member. LINK

Are you seeking to boost the search engine placement of your website so that it can be found easier by internet users? Buy text ads on one of our websites: editor-in-chief@lecanadian.com.

Written by admin

May 10th, 2010 at 11:04 pm

Featured Book – An Ambulance of the Wrong Colour: Health Professionals, Human Rights and Ethics in South Africa

leave a comment

Edited by John Stokes

An Ambulance of the Wrong Colour: Health Professionals, Human Rights and Ethics in South Africa

A study on the ethical problems afflicting the health sector this work catalogues, through numerous cases, the misconduct of health professionals with regard to civilians, prisoners and military personnel; documents the misuse of “scientific” research, health professional and training institutions, and statutory councils for apartheid purposes; observes the failings of a profession trying to provide health care in the absence of a culture of human rights; and identifies ways in which human rights and ethical dilemmas recur in the current context of democratic transformation. The authors call for ongoing research into professional practices, training in ethics and professional conduct, and the transformation of statutory councils to build a culture of human rights within the health profession. Critical self-study is identified as a responsibility of every health worker, without exception.

Product details:

  • Paperback: 246 pages
  • Publisher: University of Cape Town Press (31 Dec 1999)
  • Language English
  • ISBN-10: 1919713484
  • ISBN-13: 978-1919713489
  • Written by admin

    April 21st, 2010 at 8:03 am

    Posted in Books

    Tagged with ,

    African Dance: An Artistic, Historical, and Philosophical Inquiry

    leave a comment

    Acquire this book from The Canadian, editor-in-chief@lecanadian.com
    .
    Edited by John Stokes
      
    African Dance: An Artistic, Historical, and Philosophical Inquiry
     
     

    This is a collection of essays written by scholars and professionals on the field of Dance and African American Studies covering four major areas of the disciplines. It provides historical, philosophical and aesthetic information on the subject matter drawing from the African continent and the African Diaspora.

    .
    Product details:
    .
    • Paperback: 272 pages
    • Language: English
    • ISBN-10: 0865431973
    • ISBN-13: 978-0865431973
    • Product Dimensions: 21.6 x 13.9 x 2 cm
    • Shipping Weight: 363 g

    Written by admin

    April 21st, 2010 at 7:52 am

    Posted in Books

    Tagged with ,

    Self-publishing: Have you tried it?

    2 comments

    by CBC editors

    A huge increase in self-published books on P.E.I. has prompted the Island Writers Association to hold its first book fair in a decade.

    The association says it needs a venue to showcase the booming self-publishing industry.

    “I would say it’s tripled, quadrupled,” said author Julie Watson, who organized the event.

    “It used to be that self-publishing was a very expensive venture. It’s not anymore.”

    Rebecca Black tried for years to find a publisher but instead of giving up she decided to take a different route — doing it all on her own. Publishing 250 copies of a book costs Black about $1,500.

     
    Become an AUTHOR: Would you like to write a book, and get it published independently? Have you written a manuscript? Get your books self-published with Agora Publishing Consortium.

    Find out how: Drop us a line: editorial@agoracosmopolitan.com or orders@booksagora.com.  You can get your manuscript evaluated for book publishing readiness for only $40.00.

    Written by thecanadianheadlines

    December 26th, 2009 at 11:09 pm

    Posted in book self-publishing

    Tagged with ,

    Book fair celebrates self-publishing boom

    leave a comment

    Become an AUTHOR: Would you like to write a book, and get it published independently? Have you written a manuscript? Get your books self-published with Agora Publishing Consortium.

    Find out how: Drop us a line: editorial@agoracosmopolitan.com or orders@booksagora.com.  You can get your manuscript evaluated for book publishing readiness for only $40.00.

    by CBC editors
    .
    A huge increase in self-published books on P.E.I. has prompted the Island Writers Association to hold its first book fair in a decade.
    .

    ‘Some of the most successful writers in Canada, and everywhere in the world are self-published.’— Julie Watson, author

    The association says it needs a venue to showcase the booming self-publishing industry.

    “I would say it’s tripled, quadrupled,” said author Julie Watson, who organized the event.

    “It used to be that self-publishing was a very expensive venture. It’s not anymore.”

    Rebecca Black tried for years to find a publisher but instead of giving up, like many people she decided to take a different route — doing it all on her own. Publishing 250 copies of a book costs Black about $1,500.

    “It’s a great way of getting your work out there, sharing what you’ve written with the world, and experiencing that rush of getting your first book in print, without having to worry about waiting to be noticed by a big publisher,” she said.

    Island writers are following a much larger trend when it comes to self-publishing. New technology has made self-publishing easier than ever, with software that allows you to lay out books, and companies that print a much better product. These changes have prompted writers around the world to go it alone, and some are having great success in bypassing a publisher.

    “Some of the most successful writers in Canada, and everywhere in the world are self-published. They just don’t broadcast the fact that they’re self-published,” said Watson.

    Watson noted Jean Paré, author of the popular Company’s Coming cookbooks, started as a self-publisher, selling out of the back of her car.

    Laurie Brinklow of Charlottetown’s Acorn Press said while it is getting easier to self-publish, it is getting harder to find a publisher willing to take on new authors, partly due to funding restrictions. Brinklow said the Canada Council for the Arts, which funds publishers like Acorn Press, is looking for very specific content.

    “They’re a jury process, so they look at my books carefully every year and say, ‘Well, this contributes to Canadian culture, and this doesn’t.’ And if it isn’t then the money isn’t there,” she said.

    That can leave authors like Black, who writes romance novels, on her own.

    As in any business, marketing is key to success. Finding a space on bookstore shelves is not a challenge in Charlottetown — two large stores dedicate space to local offerings — but selling means doing more than just making the book available. Watson hopes the book fair will give help give local, self-published authors a higher profile.

    VOTE for this article.  Support more articles like this one.

     

    Written by thecanadianheadlines

    December 26th, 2009 at 11:04 pm

    Self-Publishing Your Book becomes The Ultimate Do-It-Yourself Project

    one comment

    Become an AUTHOR: Would you like to write a book, and get it published independently? Have you written a manuscript? Get your books self-published with Agora Publishing Consortium.

    Find out how: Drop us a line: editorial@agoracosmopolitan.com or orders@booksagora.com.  You can get your manuscript evaluated for book publishing readiness for only $40.00.

    by Wendy Y. Tucker

    Do you have a book in you? We all have life experiences worthy of recording in a book. How then will you bring your message to its appropriate audience? Really, there are only two choices—either find a publisher or publish your book yourself.

    Here are 5 reasons you shouldn’t self-publish.
    1. You only want to make 5-10% of the proceeds the book generates in the form of an author royalty.
    2. You enjoy editors telling you to basically rewrite your entire manuscript in their preferred style, ultimately changing the intended meaning of everything you want to say.
    3. You enjoy waiting 1-½ to 2 years for your book to be in print. You’re in no hurry.
    4. You’ve spent months or even years writing and researching your book and now want to relinquish your rights to it (such as copyrights, serial rights, foreign rights).
    5. You are sadistic and enjoy rejection from literary agents and publishers.

    Joking aside, by self-publishing:
    1. You may make more money.
    2. You will retain control over your work.
    3. You can deliver your book to the public faster.
    4. You’ll retain all legal ownership rights to your book.
    5. You maintain the ultimate decision determining whether or not your book is published.

    1. Make More Money
    Publishing industry profit margins are quite narrow. Industry statistics indicate that a profitable book will create a 10% profit for the publisher. Add that to your 10% author royalty and you’ve doubled your profit. Also, because you will have control over costs, as a self-publisher you may be able to reduce them to a level that creates an even higher profit margin.

    2. Retain Control Over Your Work
    Editing and proofreading are crucial to producing a quality book. It is highly recommended that an author have professional, outside help perform editing and proofreading services. It is all too easy for an author to overlook the errors within his or her own work. However, by maintaining control over the editing and proofreading process, you have the ultimate say over what stays in and what goes out, ensuring that what you wish to convey to your audience is what’s actually published.

    3. Get Your Book to the Public Faster
    The publishing industry typically works on an 18-month or longer cycle from the time of accepting a manuscript to the release of a new book. By self-publishing, you can bring your work to the public within 2 to 9 months after completing your manuscript, significantly reducing the time from pen to print.

    4. Retain All Legal Ownership Rights
    If your work is published by a traditional publishing company, there is a great chance that the publisher will require the ownership of most, if not all, of the legal rights to it. These rights include electronic, serial, foreign, and copyrights. By self-publishing you retain all rights to your work unless, of course, you choose to sell them.
    Suppose your novel can be converted to a screenplay for the next multi-billion dollar movie? When the production companies are ready to buy, if you own the film rights to your work, you get the money. If you don’t, your publishing company does.

    5. Maintain the Ultimate Decision Determining Whether or Not Your Book is Published
    Perhaps you are a humanitarian of sorts, desiring to disseminate your message to save the world and not necessarily to make a profit? However, the 35 publishing companies you’ve approached are uninterested in your work because they DO want to make a profit. Then, self-publishing may be the only avenue available to bring your work to the world. Also, many traditional publishers won’t work with writers not represented by a literary agent; and many agents won’t work with authors who haven’t been published before. It’s a catch-22.

    So, where do you start?
    First, do your homework! Read as many books on the subject of self-publishing as you need to feel comfortable with the steps involved in starting such a major project.

    Several great books on self-publishing and related subjects are:
    The Complete Guide to Self-Publishing by Tom and Marian Ross
    A Simple Guide to Self-Publishing by Mark Ortman
    1001 Ways to Market Your Books by John Kremer
    Publishing Basics: A Guide for the Small Press and Independent Self-Publisher by Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.
    Book Printing and Self-Publishing by Gorham Printing

    Two great web sites are:
    http://publishing.about.com, part of the About.com web portal
    http://www.bookmarket.com, maintained by John Kremer, author of 1001 Ways to Market Your Books and considered to be one of the nation’s foremost authorities on book marketing.

    Secondly, decide who will print your book early in the process. By determining who will print your books, you ensure that you will create files or a physical document that the printer can turn into a great looking book by meeting the printer’s technical specifications. Different printers use different software and hardware for printing. Suppose you type your manuscript in WordPerfect with 1″ margins all around with a document size of 8-½ x 11″. Then, while shopping around for a printer, you find that most want ¾” margins all around, will only accept PDF or Postscript files, and that it’s much cheaper to print on 5-½ x 8-½” paper. You are then stuck with the task of reformatting your entire document.
    Finally, decide what you can and will do, and what you can’t or won’t do. If you are able and willing to do your own typesetting, then by all means save the money and do it yourself. However, if you dislike computers and dread the thought of learning yet another complex software application, contract the task out for someone else to do it.
    Self-publishing is not for everyone. It requires a significant investment in both time and money. Yet it brings a sense of great accomplishment and is highly rewarding.

    Best wishes on your self-publishing journey!

    About the writer:

    Wendy Y. Tucker may be contacted at http://www.777press.com wendy@777press.com.
    Wendy Y. Tucker is a Las Vegas native and is the self-published author of 777 Cheap Eats in Las Vegas (ISBN 0-9710486-0-6, Triple Seven Press, January 2002). The book is available at Barnes & Noble, Borders, http://www.amazon.com , http://www.bookch.com or 1–800-431-1579.

    Featured LINK.  Online dating. Alternative Lifestyles Personals. Free and Anonymous Membership
     
    VOTE for this article.  Support more articles like this one.
     
    Become an AUTHOR: Would you like to write a book, and get it published independently? Have you written a manuscript? Get your books self-published with Agora Publishing Consortium.

    Find out how: Drop us a line: editorial@agoracosmopolitan.com or orders@booksagora.com.  You can get your manuscript evaluated for book publishing readiness for only $40.00.

    Are you instead looking a better dating life?

    Then, Get our 4- Set CD Collection on Dating and Seduction designed for guys.  Guarantee available.

    Written by thecanadianheadlines

    December 24th, 2009 at 8:10 pm

    11 Tips to Avoid Self-Publishing Traps

    leave a comment

    Get your books self-published with Agora Publishing Consortium

    Drop us a line: editorial@agoracosmopolitan.com or orders@booksagora.com.  You can get your manuscript evaluated for book publishing readiness for only $40.00.

    by Marilyn and Tom Ross

    Self-publishing used to be the Rodney Dangerfield of book publishing. It didn’t get “no respect.” Today that’s all changed. With originally self-published books like The Celestine Prophecy, Butter Busters, The Christmas Box, and What Color is Your Parachute? monopolizing bestseller lists—do-it-yourself publishing is very much in vogue.

    To be successful, however, it’s mandatory that you adhere to certain guidelines. By following the tips below, you’ll avoid the pitfalls and enhance your chances of flourishing.

    1. Educate yourself. Self-publishing is a business. Approach it as such. There are informative books on the subject, seminars offered, and associations where you can learn the ropes and network with the more experienced. This can be very lucrative if properly approached. Conversely, you can waste thousands of dollars by blundering along without knowledge or a plan.

    2. Study the competition. Don’t add more to a subject that’s already glutted. Be sure the topic hasn’t been overdone. Just checking a local library or bookstore is not adequate research. Look in Books in Print Subject Guide and Forthcoming Books in Print Subject Guide. You’ll be amazed at how many books there are on the topic. Yours must be better than what’s already available. Make it shorter, longer, easier to use, more informative, funnier, richer in content, or better organized. For fiction, try to tie into a hot topic so you have a “hook” for publicity.

    3. Write what other people want. Catering to your personal desires often makes for lackluster books nobody buys. The fact is, few care about your life history or your deep-felt opinions. Personal journals and impassioned tirades are best saved for family and friends, not foist upon the general public.

    4. Think “marketing” from the very beginning. The time to generate marketing ideas is before you write the book, not after you have 3,000 copies in your garage. Identify and target your market. How can you reach them? Start folders of ideas: what catalogs might be interested, which associations reach your potential readers, what magazines and newsletters are relevant? Can you sell the book as a premium to companies that would give it away as a gift to entice new customers—or use it internally for training? Think about who else reaches your potential customer and how you can partner with them. Do you have contacts who have national name recognition and might write an advance endorsement?

    5. Get professional editing. No, we repeat no, author should edit or proofread his or her own work. You’ll miss the forest for the trees, overlooking things that are obvious to you, but unclear to your reader. And it’s so easy to pass by the same typo time after time.

    6. Create a snappy title. The right title can make a book, just like an uninspired one can be a death peal. Short is best. While clever is nice, don’t sacrifice clarity. For nonfiction, be sure to include a subtitle as it gives you extra mileage in helping readers know what the book is about.

    7. Include all the vital components. Just as a cake falls flat if you don’t add the right ingredients, so do books. Yours needs an ISBN, LCCN, EAN Bookland Scanning Symbol, subject categories on the back cover, etc. (If you don’t know what these are, refer back to #1!)

    8. Have a dynamite cover. The cover is your book’s salesperson in bookstores. Get it designed by a professional who understands cover design . . . not just somebody who does nice logos or pretty brochures. You have enormous competition—and a wonderful opportunity to stand out.

    9. Make the interior inviting. Go to a bookstore and study the insides of books. Find one with clean, “user-friendly” pages. Use this as your model. It may not make sense to purchase and learn typesetting software if you’re only doing one book, however. In that case, consider hiring an outside vendor.

    10. Use a book manufacturer for printing. Don’t expect your corner print shop to have the knowledge or technical capabilities to turn out a quality book. Book manufacturers specialize in this type of printing and can save you enormous grief and considerable money.

    11. Publicize, promote, publicize, promote. Eat, sleep, and talk your book. Nobody cares about it as much as you do. Ongoing, enthusiastic marketing is the real key to success. Never quit. Keep your antenna out for new review opportunities, freelancers who write articles on your topic, etc. We have books that have been in print since 1979 because we’re tireless promoters.

    About the writers:

    Marilyn and Tom Ross are the coauthors of 13 books including the best-selling Complete Guide to Self-Publishing and the award-winning Jump Start Your Book Sales. Through phone consultations and ongoing coaching/mentoring, Marilyn empowers authors and self-publishers to realize their dreams. She can be reached at (719) 395-8659 or Marilyn@MarilynRoss.com. You can also check out http://www.SelfPublishingResources.com and sign up for their FREE monthly ezine on how to make more money selling books—plus get your FREE downloadable copy of “15 Smart Strategies for Self-Publishing Success.” Order books by calling 800-331-8355.

    Written by thecanadianheadlines

    December 24th, 2009 at 7:55 pm

    Featured Advertisers